Monday, October 28, 2019

Halloween movement ideas, a dance story, and a short Halloween story!

Hello and Happy Fall,

Here is a playful movement lesson plan based on the classic picture book Barn Dance! by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault, along with a Halloween-based warm-up and a very short original story!



Halloween Warm Up and the
Barn Dance! Dance Story


WARM UP


The children will make up movements for the Halloween characters below. Ask them to stand in a circle. Begin with "Bat,"  ask the children to move away from the circle like a bat, and then back to their spots in the circle. Continue this same exercise through the list:

Bat
Scarecrow
Rolling Pumpkin
Robot
Black Cat
Falling Leaf
Outer Space Alien
Spider
Take suggestions from the children for more ideas, and continue this activity as long as the children are engaged.


 BARN DANCE! DANCE STORY

*A special thank-you to Kathleen Smith, fellow creative dance teacher, who introduced the ideas for this lesson plan to me.*




Materials:  

  • The book Barn Dance! by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault
  • Lively musical selections, such as a classical piece, and blue grass instrumentals
  • Optional props (1 per child): 
    • Sparkly/swirly streamers (crepe paper or fabric)
    • Bandannas
    • Orange paper plates


Instructions for presenting the dance story:

Read the book aloud to the children. Ask the children to spread out in the space.

Retell the story through movement, using the following movement prompts. Allow the children to explore each one until you move on to the next one.

It is a very quiet, clear night. Lie down and listen to the night sounds. Now wake up, stretch, tiptoe to the window, and sneak outside.  (Note:  remind the children this is a pretend story, and they should never sneak out of the house!)

Now let's dance about the night: the sparkly stars, the floating clouds, and the wind!  (play classical music selection, and pass out swirly streamers if you have them)

Listen!  The scarecrow is calling all of the animals with his music. How does a scarecrow move? Let’s move like the scarecrow. Can you play a pretend fiddle, like the scarecrow?

Now move like the animals who were following the scarecrow to the barnThere were horses, sheep, cows, pigs, raccoons, foxes, rabbits, chickens, skunks, and crows!  (play a bluegrass piece)  

Help the children put on bandannas, give everyone a "pumpkin" paper plate, and instruct the children to go to a corner of the room to hide (like the little boy in the story), asking the children to cover their faces with their paper plates. One by one, call the children's names. When you call a name, instruct the child to put her "pumpkin" down, run and jump over the apple barrel, and go back to her hiding place.  

Now ask them to all come out together and spin around like the pigs (play another bluegrass piece). Finish this section by asking each child to make a shape like a dizzy pig, and turn off the music.

Now grab a pretend apple!  It's time to go home! Do you hear the rooster crowing? That means the sun is coming up.

Walk quietly up the stairs, and sit on your bed. Take a bite out of your "apple." Was it a dream, or did the barn dance really happen?



And now, for a short (97 words!) Halloweensie story:

                     
             



                Prelude


Oh my deary, time to get ready.
What shall I wear to the Hallow’s Eve Ball?

My crookedy hat,
my raggedy gown, 
my tappity boots
for my clackity dance. 

My face will be painted a ghastly green,
with lumpity warts on full display. 

My scraggledy “do” I’ll primp and prime, 
with cobwebs twisted and tangled and tied.

And what shall I bring?
My cleverest spells, 
my gnarliest broom,
my trickedy, terrible, powerful wand.

The finishing touch:
My stinkedy, horrible potion perfume.
A little dab here, a little glop there, 

and I’ll be the smelliest of them all!








Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Montessori-Inspired Gratitude Activities Using Free Printables

By Deb Chitwood from Living Montessori Now 

I love gratitude activities at any time, but they're especially wonderful in the fall. We're having a whole gratitude unit this fall with activities that can be used year round. I've added a lot of free gratitude printables and activities along with a free gratitude pack (subscriber freebie at LivingMontessoriNow.com)! 




You'll find many activities for preschoolers through first graders throughout the year along with presentation ideas in my previous posts at PreK + K Sharing. You'll also find ideas for using free printables to create activity trays here: How to Use Printables to Create Montessori-Inspired Activities

At Living Montessori Now, I have a post with resource links of Free Printables for Montessori Homeschools and Preschools. 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links (at no cost to you).

Montessori Shelves with Gratitude-Themed Activities

Montessori Shelves with Gratitude-Themed Activities 

You’ll find Montessori-inspired gratitude numbers, letters, and and more (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber)

I always have related books available throughout a unit. On the top shelf, I have some books showing gratitude from individuals in other cultures. Gracias/Thanks is written  in both Spanish and English. Giving Thanks focuses on gratitude expressed by the Iroquois people and We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga  focuses on gratitude expressed by the Cherokee people. I added the Montessori continents globe to show where the people in the books would live.

In front of the books on the shelf are free gratitude conversation starters by teachingwithsteph at Teachers Pay Teachers. I printed them out four to a page and am rotating three at a time to use for gratitude discussions. I'm displaying them on a small wooden display stand from Montessori Services.

You could mix your gratitude-themed activities among your shelves according to curriculum area. Or you could have a special gratitude-themed area something like the one pictured. My shelves this month have a mixture of skill levels mainly from preschooler through early elementary. Many of the activities can be adapted for a variety of levels. If you’re a homeschooler, just choose the activities that work for your child’s interests and ability levels. If you don’t have room for all the activities you’d like to do, simply rotate them.

Continents Globe with Gracias/Thanks and Giving Thanks Books

Books Gracias Thanks and Giving Thanks with Continents Globe 

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga Book with Gratitude Jar and Cards

We Are Grateful Otsaliheliga Book with Gratitude Jar  

Free Printables: Thankful jar and cards from Mama Miss 

There are many nice gratitude jars for November. I especially like this printable set because it's lovely and can be used year-round. I like the idea of having "I am thankful for" cards available throughout the year. I divided mine by color and put them in a Montessori cards display box.

Seed Bead Writing Tray with G for Grateful Font Cards

Seed Bead Writing Tray with G for Grateful Font Cards

Free Printables: Grateful letter g font cards for a seed bead writing tray (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

For the writing tray, I used the wooden tray from the Melissa & Doug Lace and Trace Shapes. You can use whatever tray or container work best for you, though. I used tiny seed beads, which have a fun texture and work quite well for writing! 

If you would like help with introducing phonetic sounds, introducing objects with sounds, or beginning phonics in general, check out my DIY Beginning Montessori Phonics with Preschoolers.

Matching Cursive Gratitude Alphabet Cards to Manuscript Gratitude Alphabet Cards

Matching Gratitude Cursive Letters to Manuscript Letters 

Free Printable: Gratitude movable alphabet cards in manuscript and cursive (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

My almost-6-year-old granddaughter, Zoey, really enjoys this activity. I use it with a cursive tracing board. I got the 2-sided version (with capital letters on one side and lowercase on the other), since capital cursive letters aren’t commonly seen on written materials. After tracing the letters on the tracing board, Zoey places the manuscript letters in alphabetical order. Then she matches each of the cursive letters to the manuscript letters.

Th Phonogram Card and Booklet

Thankful th Phonogram Card and Booklet 

Free Printables: Th phonogram card (showing "thank you" in sign language) with word "thankful" (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

Free Printable: Th Phonogram Picture and Letter Cards from MontessoriSoul 

These activities are very simple to prepare. I just print out the materials and make them into little booklets. I have a post and video on how to introduce words starting with phonograms, even with very young children (although I don’t introduce phonograms to very young children except in a word like “shark” that can’t be explained as starting with /s/).

DIY Gratitude Cards and Counters with Odd and Even Labels

Tray with Graittude Cards and CountersFree Printables: Gratitude Numbers and Odd and Even Labels (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

I love making DIY themed cards and counters to introduce odd and even and add interest and variety to cards and counters. I used acrylic hearts. You need exactly 55 acrylic hearts if you want to do the numbers and counters 1-10. These are the same hearts I used for our heart activities last winter. 

For Zoey and other kids who are already comfortable with symbol and quantity, I’ll typically use the cards and counters for hands-on addition, subtraction, and other mathematical operations. (See some of my other themed posts for ideas.) But sometimes, I like to use the odd and even labels.   

The odd and even labels can be used with the cards and counters to reinforce the actual words “odd” and “even.” It’s a great way to be sure readers understand the concept of odd and even.

Gratitude Cards and Counters Layout with Odd and Even Labels 

Gratitude Scavenger Hunt for Fall

Gratitude Scavenger Hunt 
Free Printable: Gratitude Scavenger Hunt for Kids from Natural Beach Living
I just printed the scavenger hunt out at 60% and added it to a small tabletop easel on the shelf. Even my toddler grandkids will be able to have fun with some of the scavenger hunt ideas!

Fingerprint or Handprint Gratitude Cards and "Giving Back the Gratitude" Thank You Tray

Free Printable: Thank you cards from Picklebums Free Printable: Fingerprint inspiration such as the fingerprint bugs from Rays of Bliss for older preschoolers on up. Free Printable: Giving Back the Gratitude Cards by Cathy Ruth at Teachers Pay Teachers I added the Giving Back the Gratitude Cards as inspiration for a giving back tray (seen on the bottom right shelf).

Free Gratitude Printables for Preschoolers-First Graders

Montessori-Inspired Gratitude Pack for DIY Cards and Counters, Number or Letter Matching, Number or Letter Basket, Bead Bar Work, Hands-on Math Operations, Number or Letter Salt/Sand Writing Tray, Letter Tracing, DIY Movable Alphabet, and Creative Writing (subscriber freebie, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password – or check your inbox if you’re already a subscriber).






More Gratitude Resources


Have a happy and grateful autumn!
Deb - Siganture
Deb Chitwood
Deb Chitwood is a certified Montessori teacher with a master’s degree in Early Childhood Studies from Sheffield Hallam University in Sheffield, England. Deb taught in Montessori schools in Iowa and Arizona before becoming owner/director/teacher of her own Montessori school in South Dakota. Later, she homeschooled her two children through high school. Deb is now a Montessori writer who lives in San Diego with her husband of 43 years (and lives in the city where her kids, kids-in-law, and grandkids live). She blogs at Living Montessori Now.

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Sunday, September 15, 2019

Farm Activities Using Free Printables for a Montessori-Inspired Farm Unit

By Deb Chitwood from Living Montessori Now 

It's time to expand another fun, popular unit for preschoolers ... our Montessori-inspired farm unit! I've added a lot of free farm printables and activities along with a free farm pack (subscriber freebie at LivingMontessoriNow.com)! 




You'll find many activities for preschoolers through first graders throughout the year along with presentation ideas in my previous posts at PreK + K Sharing. You'll also find ideas for using free printables to create activity trays here: How to Use Printables to Create Montessori-Inspired Activities.

At Living Montessori Now, I have a post with resource links of Free Printables for Montessori Homeschools and Preschools. 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links (at no cost to you).

Montessori Shelves with Farm-Themed Activities

Montessori Shelves with Farm-Themed Activities 
You’ll find Montessori-inspired farm numbers, letters, and and more (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber)

I always have related books available throughout a unit. On the top shelf, I have two classic and endearing Montessori-friendly books: Our Animal Friends at Maple Hill Farm and The Year at Maple Hill Farm.

On the right side of the shelf ( book on a wooden cookbook holder), I have DK Smithsonian Picturepedia (beautiful photos and a fabulous reference book I use for many, many units!).

You could mix your farm-themed activities among your shelves according to curriculum area. Or you could have a special farm-themed area something like the one pictured. My shelves this month have a mixture of skill levels mainly from toddler through first grade. Many of the activities can be adapted for a variety of levels. If you’re a homeschooler, just choose the activities that work for your child’s interests and ability levels. If you don’t have room for all the activities you’d like to do, simply rotate them.

Safari Ltd Farm Animals and Key with Maple Hill Farm Books

Safari Ltd Farm Animals and Key with Maple Hill Farm Books 

Free Printable: Safari Ltd. Farm TOOB Key

These animals are from the Safari Ltd. Farm TOOB, although a variety of farm TOOBS are available. Matching the figures to the TOOB keys is a simple-to-prepare activity that's great for toddlers and young preschoolers.

Farm Booklet

Free Printable: Farm Booklet (Farm Picture-Word Cards) from PreKinders This is next to the open Picturepedia book on the top shelf. It's so easy to prepare! Just print and cut it out. The printable even has places to punch holes to make a booklet using a binder ring.

Farm Books, Spanish Farm Animal 3-Part Cards, and Schleich Farm Animals

 

Free Printable: Spanish 3-Part Cards from Totschooling at Teachers Pay Teachers

The materials were easy to prepare. I display them simply on a Multicraft tray with the added Montessori cards display box (which I love and typically use for all my 3-part cards now). I used Schleich farm animals

There are eight Spanish farm animal cards in the printable (along with many other Spanish words), although I just started with six of the cards.

My toddler grandkids love My First Farm: Let's Get Working! (and the rest of the series). National Geographic Kids Farm Animals has easy-to-understand facts and gorgeous photographs.

Because of the Spanish vocabulary, this can be used for multiple ages.

Matching Farm Animal Objects to Pictures 
My 18-month-old grandson, Caleb, and 21-month-old granddaughter, Sophia, are learning some Spanish vocabulary, so Caleb's mom, Christina, introduced them to the Spanish words while they matched the animals to the pictures.

Looking at the Farm: Let's Get Working! Book After Farm Animal Matching Activity

Caleb and Sophia didn't use the Spanish word cards, although those would be perfect for my 5½-year-old granddaughter, Zoey.

Manuscript and Cursive Writing and Spelling Materials

It's a personal preference if you like to introduce manuscript or cursive first. Many Montessorians introduce cursive first, and many Montessorians introduce manuscript first. It often depends on what your child will be encountering most. When I was a Montessori teacher, my students went on to traditional schools, so I always introduced print first. I did the same with my now-adult children as a homeschooler. I'm doing the same with my grandchildren, since they're exposed to print so often in books and other areas.

I do think that learning cursive is essential so that (at a minimum) children grow up able to read their grandparents' and great-grandparents' handwriting (and the handwriting of others from those generations). When my grandchildren are comfortable writing and reading manuscript print, I focus a lot on cursive. I do focus on it earlier with the font cards I design to go with each unit. But it isn't a thorough, focused emphasis until they're comfortable with manuscript letter writing and reading.

F is for Farm Corn Writing Tray (Middle of Middle Shelf in Shelf Photo)

Free Printables: Farm letters for corn writing tray (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

For the tray, I used the wooden tray from the Melissa & Doug Lace and Trace Shapes. You can use whatever tray or container work best for you, though. I just used popping corn for the corn. It doesn't work as well for writing as sand or salt, but it's fun and an interesting sensory experience. If you would like help with introducing phonetic sounds, introducing objects with sounds, or beginning phonics in general, check out my DIY Beginning Montessori Phonics with Preschoolers.

Montessori Farm and Barn ar Phonogram Cards

Farm and Barn ar Phonogram Cards and Booklet 
Free Printables: “ar” farm and barn phonogram cards (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber)


Free Printable: Green Series ar Letters from MontessoriSoul (Print two sets if you want to use the pictures for movable alphabet word building.)

I love the simplicity of this! It was so easy to prepare, yet it isolates the ar phonogram very well. I have a post and video on how to introduce words starting with phonograms, even with very young children.

Matching Cursive Chicken Alphabet Cards to Manuscript Chicken Alphabet Cards

Chicken Movable Alphabet or Matching Alphabet Cards in Manuscript and CursiveFree Printable: Chicken movable alphabet cards in manuscript and cursive (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

My 5½-year-old granddaughter, Zoey, really enjoyed this activity when we did it with the apple alphabet cards. I introduced it with a cursive tracing board

After tracing the letters on the tracing board, Zoey placed the manuscript letters in alphabetical order. Then she matched each of the cursive letters to the manuscript letters. We'll do a similar activity with the chicken alphabet cards.

DIY Holstein Cow and Button Cards and Counters

DIY Holstein Cow and Black Button Cards and CountersFree Printables: Holstein Cow Numbers (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber) 

I love making DIY themed cards and counters to introduce odd and even and add interest and variety to cards and counters. I found these micro (6mm) buttons that are an inviting way to represent the Holstein cows spots. You need exactly 55 buttons if you want to do the numbers and counters 1-10. The package contains 100 buttons, so there are even some left over. (Note: I used them last year in our fire safety unit for Dalmatian cards and counters.) 

DIY Holstein Cow Cards and Counters Layout 

For kids who are already comfortable with symbol and quantity, I’ll typically use the cards and counters for hands-on addition, subtraction, and other mathematical operations. (See some of my other themed posts for ideas.) But sometimes I like to use the odd and even labels like I did with the Dalmatian cards and counters.

Farm Number Matching or Addition and Subtraction Game

Farm Number Matching or Addition and Subtraction Game

Free Printable: Farm Math from Teacher Mom Plus 3 (I had this printable from before, and I just discovered it's no longer available. I'll try to find something similar for you.)

Free Printable: Holstein Cow Numbers (part of my subscriber freebie pack, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password … or check the bottom of your latest newsletter if you’re already a subscriber)

I often like to use flat glass marbles as markers for many activities (although I don't leave them out when I have toddlers around). The way I would use this printable for multiple ages is to have younger children roll the numbered dice to find a matching number. Then they could put a clear flat marble over the number.

An older child can use the number cards and symbol cards to create an addition or subtraction problem to match the number that's rolled with the dice.

Farm Bingo

Farm Animal Bingo Tray

Free Printable: Farm Animal Bingo Printable from The Preschool Toolbox

Again, flat glass marbles are fun to use as markers, although I don't recommend them when toddlers are around. I just have the printables on the tray on my shelves now.

This printable only has one page plus a page of duplicate images. You could use it as a cooperative Bingo game, or just use it for matching.

I printed out 3 copies of the first page and cut apart the pictures on one of the pages. For my toddler grandkids, we'll use the printables for picture matching. For Zoey, I've written the words in cursive on the backs of the individual cards. She can draw a card, read the name, and match it.

Free Farm Printables for Preschoolers-First Graders (some printables for up to grade 3)

Montessori-Inspired Farm Pack


Montessori-Inspired Farm Pack for DIY Cards and Counters, Number or Letter Matching, Number or Letter Basket, Bead Bar Work, Hands-on Math Operations, Number or Letter Salt/Sand Writing Tray, Letter Tracing, DIY Movable Alphabet, and Creative Writing (subscriber freebie, so just sign up for my email to get the link and password – or check your inbox if you’re already a subscriber).

For more free printables for this unit, go to my post at Living Montessori Now with Free Farm Printables and Activities for a Montessori-Inspired Farm Unit.

More Farm Resources

Montessori-Inspired Farm Unit {Hundreds of Resources}
Montessori-Inspired Farm Unit {Hundreds of Resources}
Happy autumn!
Deb - Siganture
Deb Chitwood
Deb Chitwood is a certified Montessori teacher with a master’s degree in Early Childhood Studies from Sheffield Hallam University in Sheffield, England. Deb taught in Montessori schools in Iowa and Arizona before becoming owner/director/teacher of her own Montessori school in South Dakota. Later, she homeschooled her two children through high school. Deb is now a Montessori writer who lives in San Diego with her husband of 43 years (and lives in the city where her kids, kids-in-law, and grandkids live). She blogs at Living Montessori Now.

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Thursday, August 22, 2019

"Bird Count" Picture Book, With a READ AND DANCE Lesson Plan

GREETINGS!


For this blog post, I am introducing a beautiful new picture book by Susan Edwards Richmond, with gorgeous illustrations by Stephanie Fizer Coleman, and published by Peachtree Publishing Company, Inc.

        This book will be released on October 5, 2019!




Here is a 
READ AND DANCE lesson plan to present to young children, to enrich and enhance the enjoyment of this book! This lesson is a collaboration between Susan and myself; I developed some movement prompts based on her book, and she created this full lesson plan around my movement ideas, tying it to arts and early literacy standards. She includes materials needed, explanation of how to present it, accommodations for children with special needs, and an idea for expanding this activity into an informal performance for parents and friends. 

You will find this plan, and many more imaginative ideas for preschool through fifth grade, on Susan's website. Some of the resources she has developed for a unit on birds and bird watching include linking the book to technology and math, art and music, social studies and geography, Next Generation Science Standards, and so much more! 


 Susan Edwards Richmond's Bird Count Activity Plan: 

Moving Like a Bird 





Description and Goals
Children will use movement to retell the story of Bird Count, by creating a dance that incorporates their interpretations of different birds described in the book. This activity offers children an alternative method of storytelling through a kinesthetic learning experience.
Developmental Areas and Skills: Creative and Physical Domains

Curriculum Standards and Guidelines
Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences (MA Department of Education):

Guiding Preschool Learning in the Arts: Movement and Dance: 6. Act out ways that movement
and dance can show feelings or convey meaning.

       Common Core English Language Arts Standards

Reading Literature #2: Key Ideas and Details
Reading Literature #7: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Speaking & Listening #2: Comprehension and Collaboration


       Objectives

      Children will use their bodies to act out the movements of       birds in the story.

          Children will work cooperatively to create a dance based on their creative ideas.

  • Materials

  • Bird Count by Susan Edwards Richmond, illustrated by Stephanie Fizer Coleman. 
  • Music and a method to play it, such as a CD player.

  •  An open space in the classroom or outdoors.


  • Introduction

  • Read or review Bird Count by Susan Edwards Richmond, illustrated by Stephanie Fizer Coleman. Ask children if they can think of other ways to tell the story without using words. Tell them that, today, they are going to recreate the story using movement, or dance.

  • Procedure

  • 1Introduce Activity (above)

  • 2. Show children the illustrations of each bird in the story, one at a time.
            For each bird, ask: How might this bird move?

       3. Give movement prompts, and incorporate childrens ideas. Here are some examples:




  •  Canada goose: Can you fly like a Canada goose? They are very strong fliers. Flap your wings as you sail through the sky. Now land in Curcurbit Farm’s fields, just like in the story.
    Fly like a Canada goose!

  •  Downy woodpecker: Fly like a woodpecker, and land in a tall tree. Use your long beak to peck and find insects.

  •  Duck: Imagine you are swimming like the mallards in the pond, and turn upside down with your bottom sticking up! Now dive like a merganser.

  • Great blue heron: Stretch your long neck looking for fish. You see one! Try to catch it.


page1image3907950528
Turn upside down like a mallard!

  • 4. Once you have explored movement with all of the birds in the story, play some lively music and ask the children to dance freely about pretending to be all of the birds in the book.

  • 5.  Optional: If children are interested, have them choose which birds theyd like to be.Then retell the story, asking each one to perform when they are introduced in the text.
Conclusion

Wrap up the activity when interest wanes or the activity begins to stray. Ask children if they would like to perform their dance for their families. If so, tell them you will revisit the activity at a later time to practice and prepare. If there is interest, you may wish to add an art component by encouraging children to create costumes or sets.

Accommodations

This activity provides children with challenges expressing themselves verbally an alternative method of expression. Allow children to participate using whatever kinds of movement they are comfortable with. Children who use a wheelchair can use their arms to imitate birds or maneuver the wheelchair in ways that imitate bird movement. Give children who may need additional focus a job to do, such as helping to display the book pages, or leading particular movements.

Evaluation
The activity will be successful if the children engage in movement that represents different birds in the story. Other measures of success are if the children are able to incorporate some of their own original ideas into their movements and if they can cooperate with others in performing a class dance!

Family/Community Engagement
Present the dance at a community celebration or special event. Or record the dance and share it in a weekly newsletter or on a class website.




Keep on dancin',


Connie


Moving Is Learning!




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